CONTROLLED F.O.R.C.E. LEVEL 4

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CRITICAL INCIDENT SMALL TEAM TACTICS

First Official Response in a Critical Environment (F.O.R.C.E.)

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Controlled F.O.R.C.E. Level 4: Critical Incident Small Team Tactics, also referred to as the F.O.R.C.E. Course, seeks to provide a systematic approach to searching for and neutralizing an active shooter threat. The F.O.R.C.E. Course gives first responding officers a basic skill set for working together to transition through a high-threat environment as quickly and effectively as possible.

Controlled F.O.R.C.E. Level 1 teaches principles of body movement, body positioning, leverage, transitions, and team communication. Level 4 applies those principles in a dynamic team response capability.

Response to Active Shooter and Deadly Force Encounter

In a spontaneously occurring Active Shooter situation, survival and success depends on immediate action. Controlled F.O.R.C.E. Level 4: Critical Incident Small Team Tactics hones muscle memory, enabling the First Responder to immediately recall vital tactics under stress.

This rapid and intense course is packaged in compounding drill format to give you high reps so you can immediately recall survival skills when you need them the most.

There are major key elements of tactical response that Operators, such as SWAT, SRT, Special Forces, spend a great deal of time honing in order to be able to re-gain control of a critical environment. Some of these key elements are necessary for first responding personnel to understand in order to survive and effectively control a critical environment as it spontaneously occurs. Controlled F.O.R.C.E. has developed a method of basic tactical response training formulated to the specific needs of the First Responder.

Key elements of tactical response that First Responders must have an understanding of include:

  • Tubular Tactical Entry
  • Individual and Team Dynamic Tactical Entry
  • Tactical Ingress and Egress
  • Improvised Team Tactics
  • Room Clearing, Hallway Clearing, Stairway Clearing
  • Threat Identification and Response
  • Environment Control Measures / Areas of Responsibility
  • Zone Domination for Response to Secondary Attack

If recent trends in school shootings, church shootings, and even military base shootings teach us anything, it is that well armed, skilled gunmen with the motivation and determination to wreak havoc can cause massive loss of life in a matter of moments. What’s more, we all know that routine situations such as domestic calls can turn extremely violent in an instant. Personnel that respond to these situations must have a basic tactical response capability to act in a manner that eliminates all threats as quickly as possible.

Combative Counter Measures

Active shooter events do not occur in a static environment. One of the critical components of an active shooter event is the need to deal with civilians in an unclear, high-threat environment. First Responders must have a plan for quickly and decisively determining if people they encounter while transitioning through the environment are an immediate threat. This section of the F.O.R.C.E. Course develops skills for responding to and neutralizing new immediate threats as they occur in the high-risk environment.

By going in with options for making contact with civilians that may or may not pose an immediate threat, First Responders will be able to quickly neutralize potential threats and continue moving toward the primary objective. This section of training provides the First Responder with subject control options for holstering sidearm while in contact with subject, or using control tactics with a drawn sidearm. This section includes the following drills for developing skills for responding to and neutralizing new immediate threats:

  • Tactical Movements on the Ground: Falls, Weapon Drawing, Recoveries
  • High-Stress Multi-Tasking and Transitioning Drills
  • Weapon Drawing and Re-holstering While in Contact with Opponent

High-Threat Environment Control

Just as First Responders must make quick determinations about people they encounter in the high-threat environment, they must make quick assessments of the rooms and spaces they encounter. This section of training provides First Responders with team transitioning techniques for making quick threat assessments of rooms to keep the team moving toward a known threat. This section includes the following drills for developing environment control skills:

  • Threat Identification and Response Drills
  • Tactical Team Movement, Blow-by Room Scans, and Dynamic Entry Drills
  • Areas of Responsibility: Secure, Support, and Transition

Rapid Deployment Search Team Transitions

One of the challenges of responding to a critical environment is the disorganization that can occur as responders from various agencies arrive on-scene. This section of training provides First Responders with options for coordinating rapid depolyment search team efforts so that all responding officers are effectively working together as a team to dominate and secure the high-threat environment. This section includes the following drills for developing rapid deployment search team transition skills:

  • Individual and Small Team Tactics
  • Improvised Command Post
  • Integration of Multiple Agency Responses


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For information about Critical Incident Small Team Tactics Training, contact us at:

Toll-Free Phone: 1-800-301-9292

Office Phone: 630-365-1700

Email: info@controlledforce.com

Controlled F.O.R.C.E. Level 4: Critical Incident Small Team TacticsPrint Version

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